Wednesday, October 22, 2014

MELODEON: 'Franz Liszt & the Americans' preview video; Soprano Marti Newland 4 PM Sunday, Oct. 26, Church of the Epiphany, 74th & York, NYC



Marti Newland
www.martinewland.com

Marti Newland, soprano
George Spitzer, baritone
Andrew Sun, piano
Artis Wodehouse, harmonium and piano

Sunday October 26, 4 PM, Church of the Epiphany, 74th and York, NYC

First New York Performance - Laura Sonnets (2010) for baritone and piano by William Bolcom

Tannhauser Overture transcribed for solo piano by Franz Liszt

Liszt's Petrarch Songs for mezzo soprano and piano

American Harmonium: selections by Franz Liszt and by his American student, Arthur Bird

 
Tickets
$20 general • $15 student/senior
available at the door and at artiswodehouse.com

The triumphant all-American opera returns to Lyric: The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess Opens Monday, November 17 with 13 performances through December 20


November 17 - December 20, 2014

  •                          by The Gershwins
  • Porgy and Bess
    by George Gershwin, DuBose and Dorothy Heward and Ira Gershwin

    In English with projected English texts
  • Approximate running time: 3hrs, 10 min

Redemption is hard to find.

Porgy and Bess is the great American opera — bursting with iconic songs that have moved easily into the worlds of jazz and pop, becoming hits again for generation after generation. Six years after its triumphant Lyric debut, Francesca Zambello's big, beautiful, epic production returns with its finely etched portrait of life in Catfish Row — a vibrant but impoverished African-American community on the South Carolina coast.
There's Crown, the brutish thug; Sportin' Life, the smooth-talking drug peddler; Bess, the good-time girl who finally finds love with the goodhearted Porgy; and Porgy himself, the lame beggar who's the strongest of them all — an unquenchable spirit who'll stop at nothing to reclaim the woman he loves.

Lyric Opera Presentation. Generous sponsors are the Elizabeth Morse Genius Charitable Trust, The Elizabeth Morse Charitable Trust, Cherryl T. Thomas and Ardmore Associates, and Roberta L. and Robert J. Washlow with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Production owned by Washington National Opera.
- See more at: http://www.lyricopera.org/porgy/#sthash.x2pYJMz1.dpuf

  •                          by The Gershwins
  • Porgy and Bess
    by George Gershwin, DuBose and Dorothy Heward and Ira Gershwin

    In English with projected English texts
  • Approximate running time: 3hrs, 10 min

Redemption is hard to find.

Porgy and Bess is the great American opera — bursting with iconic songs that have moved easily into the worlds of jazz and pop, becoming hits again for generation after generation. Six years after its triumphant Lyric debut, Francesca Zambello's big, beautiful, epic production returns with its finely etched portrait of life in Catfish Row — a vibrant but impoverished African-American community on the South Carolina coast.
There's Crown, the brutish thug; Sportin' Life, the smooth-talking drug peddler; Bess, the good-time girl who finally finds love with the goodhearted Porgy; and Porgy himself, the lame beggar who's the strongest of them all — an unquenchable spirit who'll stop at nothing to reclaim the woman he loves.

Lyric Opera Presentation. Generous sponsors are the Elizabeth Morse Genius Charitable Trust, The Elizabeth Morse Charitable Trust, Cherryl T. Thomas and Ardmore Associates, and Roberta L. and Robert J. Washlow with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts.
Production owned by Washington National Opera.
- See more at: http://www.lyricopera.org/porgy/#sthash.x2pYJMz1.dpuf

Rick Robinson & River Oaks Chamber Orchestra Win 'Music Alive: New Partnerships' grant of $7,500 from League of American Orchestras & New Music USA

Rick Robinson
http://cuttime.com/

League of American Orchestras and New Music USA Announce Music Alive: New Partnerships

Twelve One-Week Residencies for Composers and Orchestras
 
New York, NY (October 22, 2014) – Twelve orchestras and composers have been selected to receive Music Alive: New Partnerships grants of $7,500 each, the League of American Orchestras and New Music USA announced today. Matching composers and orchestras who have not previously worked together, the program will support a series of one-week residencies between 2014 and 2016, each culminating in the performance of an orchestral work from the composer's catalog. Orchestras with operating budgets of approximately $7 million and below were eligible to apply.

"These new Music Alive residencies provide communities across the country with invaluable opportunities to hear the music of our time while connecting in-person with these talented composers," said League President and CEO Jesse Rosen. "Supporting orchestras in their commitment to perform the works of living American composers has always been an institutional priority for the League, with programs such as Ford Made in America and the ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming historically playing an important role at the organization."

"Through the generosity of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and our other funders, we are delighted to be continuing our support of collaborations between composers and orchestras," commented Ed Harsh, President and CEO of New Music USA. "Through Music Alive and in many other ways, New Music USA supports the dynamic, sustained relationships between individual creative artists and orchestras that are essential to a healthy musical ecology."
The composer/orchestra partnerships are:

Clarice Assad and Boston Landmarks Orchestra

Douglas Cuomo and Grant Park Music Festival (Chicago)

Annie Gosfield and Chautauqua Symphony (NY)

Takuma Itoh and Tucson Symphony Orchestra

Jingjing Luo and Princeton Symphony Orchestra (NJ)

Missy Mazzoli and Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra

Rick Robinson and River Oaks Chamber Orchestra (Houston)

Carl Schimmel and Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra (New Orleans) 

Laura Schwendinger and Richmond Symphony Orchestra (VA)

Derrick Spiva and Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra    

Sumi Tonooka and South Dakota Symphony Orchestra (Sioux Falls)

Dan Visconti and Arkansas Symphony Orchestra (Little Rock)

Composer bios can be found here.

Forty-four orchestras and 219 composers applied for the program and two artistic panels selected the twelve grantees. Each residency will include a performance of a work by the composer, as well as individually tailored events, enabling the composers to reach new audiences, interact with youth, and take part in community-centered activities.

Now in its 14th year, Music Alive supports composer residencies in the concert halls and communities of orchestras throughout the country by providing funding, administrative support, and resources for both short and multi-year orchestra-composer collaborations. In addition to the new Music Alive: New Partnerships program, Music Alive also currently supports a three-year residency program for five composers and orchestras, most recently announced in 2013. Since 1999, there have been 127 Music Alive orchestral residencies; that number includes 78 individual orchestras and 110 individual composers (several orchestras and composers have participated multiple times). Music Alive programs help orchestras increase new music opportunities for audiences, artists, and administrators; identify model practices for sustained partnerships between artists and communities; help orchestras fully and comprehensively achieve their missions; and enrich orchestral repertoire with fresh and inventive music of our time.


*** 
 
Funding for Music Alive is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Aaron Copland Fund for Music, The ASCAP Foundation Bart Howard Fund, the Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts, and The Amphion Foundation.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

YouTube Videos Show Kalena Bovell Guest Conducting Hartt Orchestra in Bartok's 'Rumanian Dances' and Handel's 'Sarabande in D Minor'

Kalena Bovell

On September 24, 2014 AfriClassical posted:


Kalena Bovell writes:

Greetings Mr. Zick,
Thank you again for sharing information about me on the africlassical blog a couple of weeks ago. 

I wanted to share the videos of the two pieces that I conducted from the concert you mentioned. I hope you enjoy them and I hope that you are well.

Bartok Rumanian Dances (6:49)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfrVM83oi9E

Handel Sarabande in D Minor (7:09)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouAiWenq0VA

~Kalena

'Odyssey Of An African Opera Singer: From Zwide Township To The World Stage' by Musa Ngqungwana Now on Kindle, In Paperback Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

Odyssey Of An African Opera Singer:
From Zwide Township To The World Stage
Musa Ngqungwana

On August 12, 2014 AfriClassical posted:


John Malveaux of 
writes:

South African bass-baritone Musa Ngqungwana www.musangqungwana.com has chronicled his unlikely South African life climbing to major roles on international opera stages.

The book is now out on Kindle through Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ONVQNYE and available on paperback/hardcopy through Createspace eStore: ​https://www.createspace.com/4995342 

It will also be available on paperback for a wide distribution through Amazon, Amazon UK and Amazon Europe beginning Friday, October 24.

Thanks
John 

Penticton Western News: Afro-Brazilian Celso 'Machado brings magic of the rainforest to showcase'

Celso Machado (b. 1953) is an Afro-Brazilian classical guitarist and composer who makes his home in Canada. His website is: http://www.CelsoMachado.com. He is also featured at AfriClassical.com.


Penticton, British Columbia, Canada

October 21, 2014

by Dale Boyd

The sound of the Brazilian rainforest is making its way to Penticton.

Celso Machado will be performing his unique musical showcase of Brazilian Music and Sounds of the Rainforest on Oct. 26 at the Cleland Theatre put on by Children’s Showcase.

Originally from Brazil, the four-time Juno nominee currently resides in Gibsons after moving to Canada a decade ago.

His musical base lies in classical guitar, but he brings a vast array of instruments to his performance. His set list acts like a bonafide musical tour of the world including pieces featuring Middle Eastern flute called a nay (or ney in some countries), a ngoni which is the great grandfather of the banjo originating from West Africa, as well as a 22-string African harp called a kora — which is so fragile he can’t take it with him on flights.

Alongside his instrumental range, Machado also produces soundscapes including birds, animals, rain and thunderstorms, all done without any pre-recorded accompaniment.

“It’s all done live with different sounds, there’s actually nothing recorded it’s all live,” Machado said.
The thunderstorm is a particularly challenging sound both to perform and prepare.

“You never stop to take a breath you keep on blowing in to the microphone continuously. It can go for five or 10 minutes nonstop.”

Machado says he has to assure concert technicians that the microphones are the right type and in the right position.

“They get really surprised when I show them the position I want the microphone in. They say it’s not going to work, so that has been a challenge for me,” Machado laughed.

Perhaps the most interesting of his many instruments is a one-of-a-kind porous rock he found on a beach, which he blows in to to make a unique sound.


“Sometimes the kids ask what my favourite instrument is and I tell them my favourite one is this particular rock because i found it on a beach. Nobody can claim any copyrights on that.”

The Black Horn: The Story of Classical French Hornist Robert Lee Watt


The Black Horn: The Story of Classical French Hornist Robert Lee Watt
R & L Publishers
October 2014


On December 13, 2009 AfriClassical posted:


On October 17, 2014 Robert Watt's autobiography was published in hard cover and ebook formats.  It is widely available:

The Black Horn: The Story of Classical French Hornist Robert Lee Watt tells the story of the first African American French Hornist hired by a major symphony in these United States. Today, the number of African Americans who hold chairs in major American symphony orchestras are few and far between, and Watt is the first in many years to write about this uniquely exhilarating—and at times painful—experience. 

The Black Horn chronicles the upbringing of a young boy first fascinated by the sound of the French horn. Watt walks readers through the many obstacles presented by the racial climate in the United States both on and off stage in his efforts learn and eventually master an instrument little considered in the African American community, with even the author’s own father, who played trumpet, seeking to dissuade the young classical musician in the making. Opposition from within the community—a “middle instrument suited only for thin-lipped white boys,” Watt’s father once chided—and from without, Watt document his struggles as a student at an all-white major music conservatory as well as his first job in a major symphony orchestra after his conservatory canceled his scholarship.

Watt subsequently chronicles his triumphs and travails as a musician, sometimes alone when confronting the realities of race in America and the world of classical music. This work will surely interest any working classical musician and student, particularly those of color, seeking to grasp firsthand the sometimes troubled history of being the only “black horn.” 

Monday, October 20, 2014

Nasher Sculpture Center Announces 'Melvin Edwards: Five Decades'; first retrospective in more than 20 years

Melvin Edwards (b. 1937)

The Nasher Sculpture Center presents the first 
retrospective in more than 20 years of the 
renowned American sculptor, Melvin Edwards, 
including never-before exhibited works


DALLAS, Texas (October 20, 2014) –The Nasher Sculpture Center announces the exhibition 
Melvin Edwards: Five Decades, a retrospective of the 
renowned American sculptor, January 31-May 10, 
2015. Melvin Edwards’s career spans crucial periods of 
upheaval and change in American culture and society, 
and his sculpture provides a critical bridge between 
modernist techniques and materials and contemporary 
approaches to the art object.  In 1988, New York 
Times critic Michael Brenson lauded Edwards as “one 
of the best American sculptors… [and] one of the least 
known.”  Over the past five decades, Edwards has 
produced a remarkable body of work redefining the 
modernist tradition of welded sculpture.

“Exhibiting the work of Melvin Edwards is a tremendous 
privilege for the Nasher,” says Director Jeremy Strick. 
“His expansive, decades long sculptural practice in
welded 
steel fuses vital Modernist traditions with deeply
held personal and social convictions, and the results are
uniquely powerful artistic responses to some of the most
volatile and pivotal events of our times. In addition to its
historical and political relevance, Edwards’s work also
has important connections with the radical
experimentation and international outlook of 
contemporary art, positioning him as an artist of rare
versatility and reach.”

Melvin Edwards:  Five Decades bears witness to
Edwards’s profound commitment, from the very
beginning of his career, to an art that is both abstract
and deeply engaged with meaning and expression.  A
truly international artist well before the advent of
today’s global art world, Edwards has brought his
experiences of other cultures and languages,
particularly those of Africa, into his work, to explore
the varied ways that art can forge bonds of connection
and kinship. He is best known for his Lynch Fragments,
an ongoing series of small-scale reliefs begun in Los 
Angeles in the early 1960s and born out of the social 
and political turmoil of the civil rights movement. 
Incorporating tools and other familiar objects, such as 
chains, locks, and ax heads, Edwards’s Lynch Fragments 
are abstract yet evocative, summoning a range of artistic, 
cultural, and historical references. 

Melvin Edwards:  Five Decades will feature a broad 
selection of Lynch Fragments, including early 
manifestations, which spoke to racial tensions and political 
and cultural struggles of the 1960s; Edwards’s return to
the 
series in the early 1970s, during the Vietnam War; and
group from 1978 to the present, exploring memory, 
history, and African and African American culture.
   
***

For more information, visit www.NasherSculptureCenter.org.

Eric Conway, D.M.A.: Theatre Morgan: 'The Nacirema Society Requests the Honor of Your Presence at the Celebration of Their First One-Hundred Years' Opens Oct. 24

Eric Conway, D.M.A.:

Hello everyone,

I just want to alert you to the next Theatre Morgan event:  The Nacirema Society Requests the Honor of Your Presence at the Celebration of Their First One-Hundred Years written by award-winning playwright Pearl Cleage.

This play will take place in Turpin-Lamb Theatre.  There are as many as seven performances.  Rather than list all dates and times in the body of this email, please see attached a scanned flyer with all information.

I believe that this has to be the longest title of a show that I have ever seen!  At the least, the title is very intriguing.  

As always, I will give report back to you after I attend a performance. Save the Dates!

Eric

Virginia Kay: Prof. Emily Abrams Ansari Wins ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for Article on Ulysses Kay's Opera 'Jubilee'

Ulysses Kay (1917-1995) is profiled at 
AfriClassical.com, which features a comprehensive Works List by Prof. Dominique-René de Lerma, http://www.CasaMusicaledeLerma.com.

Emily Abrams Ansari, PhD
Assistant Professor (Musicology)
University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada

The award-winning article by Prof. Emily Abrams Ansari is:

"Vindication, Cleansing, Catharsis, Hope": Interracial
Reconciliation and the Dilemmas of Multiculturalism
in Kay and Dorr's Jubilee (1976)
 

It was published in American MusicVol. 31, No. 4
(Winter 2013),  pp. 379-419.  The link has been added
to the Ulysses Kay page.


Virginia Kay, daughter of Ulysses Kay, writes:

Dear Bill,


Emily Abrams Ansari
was chosen as winner of the ASCAP 

Deems Taylor Award for her article on Ulysses Kay's 
opera Jubilee, which was based on the novel by Margaret 
Walker. The author is based in Canada, so I'll represent 
her at the awards ceremony on November 12.​​ 


Good weekend to you,

Virginia


The University of Illinois Press and JSTOR.org 
provide this introduction to the article, which



of the possibilities of interracial collaboration and
reconciliation.


Comments by email:

1) Hello Bill! What a happy surprise!​ I'm so glad
you decided to post it! I remember the premiere 
performance and, man, I sure won't forget the  
cocktail receptions with those Mississippi opera 
guild types. It's amazing to me that they (Dad
& Dorr) survived it!  But I had no idea of
what it  all meant at the national &
institutional levels. Emily puts it in perspective
and illuminates it, a real contribution. Thanks
again, Virginia [Virginia Kay]

2) Dear Bill, Thank you so much for sharing
my news with your readers! I am most
honored. There is no text as yet, but there
may yet be when I receive it officially in
November.  With best wishes, Emily [Emily
Abrams Ansari]